Mental Health and Wellbeing

 

This page has been endorsed by the York Youth Council

 

Family life, friends, school, work and many other things can leave you feeling stressed, sad, lonely or worried. The most important thing to remember is that you are not alone and looking for advice and support is exactly the right thing to do.

Feeling Unhappy, Sad or Depressed?

wall mental health and wellbeing

 

Anxiety

There is lots in life to make us anxious, from being worried about school work to problems with relationships. Feeling anxious sometimes is normal – most people worry about something – our body tells us we are anxious through the feelings we experience. These feelings are different for each person. If your anxiety stops you from doing everyday things and the things that you enjoy doing it can leave you feeling unhappy. It’s important that you find someone you can trust to talk to.

http://www.inhand.org.uk/

https://stem4.org.uk/

https://anxietyuk.org.uk/

Depression

We all feel low or down at times but if your negative feelings last a long time it is important that you talk to someone about how you are feeling, particularly if you are feeling irritable, upset, miserable or lonely for long periods of time or not wanting to do things that you previously enjoyed.

www.moodjuice.scot.nhs.uk

Self harm

Self harm is when you hurt yourself on purpose. It can be very difficult to talk about and you may feel that no one will understand. But there is lots of advice and support out there. If you are having feelings of self harm it is important that you don’t ignore the feelings .You must find someone you can trust to talk to.

http://www.harmless.org.uk/

https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/feelings-and-symptoms/self-harm/

Suicide

You may feel like there is no hope or might think about ending their life. Whilst thinking about suicide is relatively common, very few young people will actually attempt to take their own lives. However even having suicidal thoughts clearly shows someone is unhappy and needs help and support. It can be difficult to understand what causes suicidal feelings but they’re often triggered by upsetting experiences such as: – living with mental illness – experiencing abuse – being bullied – bereavement after losing a loved one – being forced to marry – having very low self-worth

https://www.papyrus-uk.org/help-advice/about-hopelineuk

https://www.samaritans.org/

Addiction

Many teenagers face some form of addiction at some point in their life. Although addiction to drugs is most commonly reported – alcohol and nicotine in particular – there are a number of other substances and activities or behaviours that create the same sense of dependency and resistance to withdrawal. These include gaming, gambling, sex, pornography, food, exercise, the Internet and other technology such as mobile phones, work and compulsive buying

https://www.talktofrank.com/

http://gamcare.org.uk/

Talk to somebody

Somebody you trust. This could be a parent or carer, another family member or a friend. Talking to somebody who can listen to you, can really help you feel better about the issue you are experiencing and make you feel as though you are not having to deal with this on your own.

Your GP. They can listen – if you’re willing to talk to them. If you have been self-harming the doctor will be able to treat injuries and give medical advice. They could also refer you for specialist help if you need it. This could be a therapist who will work with you to discuss your thoughts and feelings and how this is affecting you.

Your School. Speak to somebody you can trust at school, this could be your form teacher or a teacher you have a good relationship with. Teachers are becoming increasingly aware of child self-harm and mental illness. The school will almost certainly have experience of helping other pupils and their families. The school should be able to provide a named member of staff who you can go to if they’re struggling with low mood or wanting to harm themselves. This might be a counsellor, a mentor or a nurse, for example.

Childline. Childline has trained counsellors who can help you to talk about the emotions you may be feeling in a safe space. You may find it easier to open up to someone you don’t know. They talk to under 19’s online or over the telephone on 0800 1111. Calls are free and do not show up on itemised phone bills.

The Mix. The Mix have a free helpline to under 25s, where you can talk to a trained supporter about any issue, from 4pm to 11pm every day, on 0808 808 4994.

Apps

 

     
 Kooth    MeeTwo

 

     
 In Hand    The Mix

 

Other Information

YorOK

Fulford Minds

York Mind

Young Minds

Papyrus

Samaritans

CAHMS

The Mix

 

York Youth Council small